Blog Rating

Selected Books by Edmund Blair Bolles

  • Galileo's Commandment: 2500 Years of Great Science Writing
  • The Ice Finders: How a Poet, a Professor, and a Politician Discovered the Ice Age
  • Einstein Defiant: Genius vs Genius in the Quantum Revolution

« Meanwhile Back With the Group | Main | Crying With an Accent »

Comments

JoseAngel

A very suggestive entry, and book I should say. It suggests, too, that the link between bipedality, difficult births, neotenical (and helpless) infants, and community bonding needs further reflection and research. And the issue of speech comes right in the middle of that, of course.

Mariana

Very interesting, I learned a lot about the basics of human beings. Txs.
I am happy cause my blog is called singyourownlullaby, and now I know information about lullabies I did not know before. Txs again

Ergo Baby Carrier

As Falk points out, this sharing of the responsibility by the group and trusting of the others by the mother is unknown among other primates.
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BLOGGER: I'm letting this comment stand even though I suspect it is an ad. Doubt goes to the runner.

Moby Wrap

A savanna species whose mothers are unable to transport their young and also lacking the social support that humans enjoy is the Thompson’s gazelle. Their young survive by not moving. They wait patiently, without moving until their mother’s return to nurse them.
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BLOGGER: Yes, and I once saw a jackal kill a young gazelle who made the mistake of moving when a hawk swooped at it. However, Tommy gazelles have a fixed territory, so the mothers don't go too far.

Katherine

You might be interested in the article by Archaeologist and anthropologist Timothy Taylor who hypothesises that tools use came before Homo species, that Australopithecines were responsible for the stone tools and used these to create baby slings to carry their young. Enabling the development of bipedalism and big brains. http://gizmodo.com/5619821/artificial-ape-man-how-technology-created-humans.

Here http://www.duncancaldwell.com/Site/Baby_Sling_Adaptations.html Duncan Caldwell hypothesises slings allowed for premature birth and brain development post natally and that hair loss resulted to combat parasites in hide slings.

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